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Events

OXONIA Distinguished Speaker Events in
Michaelmas Term 2008

 

What the Shift of Economic Power to Asia Really Means

By Bill Emmott (former Editor of The Economist)

 
Chair: Dr. D. Lombardi

Date: Tuesday 11 November 2008

Venue: Lecture Theatre, Economics Department Building

Time: 5:00pm

 

Bio

Bill Emmott is a member of the executive committee of the Trilateral Commission, a director of Development Consultants International, a Dublin-based company, a member of the Swiss Re Chairman's Advisory Panel, an adviser to JR Central, a member of the President's Council of the University of Tokyo, a director of the UK-Japan 21st Century Group, and co-chairman (with the Hon Roy MacLaren) of the Canada-Europe Roundtable for Business. He was a director of The Economist Group from 1993 until 2006. He is a trustee of the Marjorie Deane Financial Journalism Foundation. He has honorary degrees from Warwick and City Universities, and is an honorary fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford. After studying politics, philosophy and economics at Magdalen College, Oxford, he moved to Nuffield College to do his postgraduate research. His latest book is "Rivals--How the Power Struggle between China, India and Japan will Shape our Next Decade", published by Allen Lane/Penguin in April 2008. The paperback edition will be out in April 2009.

This seminar is organised in cooperation with the Economics Department, University of Oxford.


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