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Events

OXONIA Distinguished Speaker Event in
Michaelmas Term 2010

 

Losing Control

By Stephen King (HSBC)

 

 

Chair: Domenico Lombardi (OXONIA)

Date: Wednesday November 24, 2010

Venue: Lecture Theatre, Economics Department Building

Time: 5:00 pm

 

Bio

Stephen King is Group Chief Economist at HSBC and columnist on the Independent newspaper. He is HSBC’s group chief economist and the Bank’s global head of economics and asset allocation research. He is directly responsible for HSBC’s global economic coverage and co-ordinates the research of HSBC economists all over the world. Stephen joined HSBC in 1988. From 1990 through to 1993, he was responsible for HSBC’s views on the Japanese economy. From 1993 through to 1998, he was responsible for the bank’s views on Europe. He became the bank’s chief economist in 1998. Stephen has written on a wide variety of economic topics: recent examples include a report on China’s role in the world economy, an analysis of global inflation pressures and a study of external imbalances. Since 2001, Stephen has been writing a weekly column for “The Independent”, one of the UK’s leading newspapers. He appears regularly on both television and radio. He has given written and oral evidence on the economic effects of globalisation to the House of Commons Treasury and Civil Service Committee and the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee. He has also given oral evidence to the House of Lords Committee on UK monetary policy. Stephen’s career began at H.M. Treasury, where he was an economic adviser within the civil service. He studied economics and philosophy at Oxford.

This event is possible thanks to the kind support of Oxford Economics.


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